Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online
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Description

Product Description

Martin and Rebecca Cate, founders and owners of Smuggler’s Cove (the most acclaimed tiki bar of the modern era) take you on a colorful journey into the lore and legend of tiki: its birth as an escapist fantasy for Depression-era Americans; how exotic cocktails were invented, stolen, and re-invented; Hollywood starlets and scandals; and tiki’s modern-day revival, in this James Beard Award-winning cocktail book.

Featuring more than 100 delicious recipes (original and historic), plus a groundbreaking new approach to understanding rum, Smuggler’s Cove is the magnum opus of the contemporary tiki renaissance. Whether you’re looking for a new favorite cocktail, tips on how to trick out your home tiki grotto, help stocking your bar with great rums, or inspiration for your next tiki party, Smuggler’s Cove has everything you need to transform your world into a Polynesian Pop fantasia.

Make yourself a Mai Tai, put your favorite exotica record on the hi-fi, and prepare to lose yourself in the fantastical world of tiki, one of the most alluring—and often misunderstood—movements in American cultural history.

Review

WINNER: 2017 JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION BOOK AWARD, BEVERAGE

WINNER: 2017 SPIRITED AWARDS (TALES OF THE COCKTAIL): BEST NEW COCKTAIL & BARTENDING BOOK


"Martin and Rebecca Cate are alchemists—Reyn Spooner–wearing, volcano-bowl-igniting, Polynesian-popping, double-straining, Aku-Aku swilling alchemists. Which is to say, they are the finest kind of alchemists known to walk the earth. Buy this book. It will bring you a little bit closer to paradise.”
—Wayne Curtis, author, And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails

“With Smuggler’s Cove, Martin Cate did the impossible, folding up a whole rum-soaked sailing ship so that it would fit into a not-very-large San Francisco storefront. Now he’s done it again, and taken that tiki bar--one of the very finest bars I know—and folded it up so it fits between the pages of a book. Just add rum, and watch Smuggler’s Cove—and the whole vibrant, geeky, just a little bit unhinged world of tiki it so perfectly exemplifies— unfold in your lap.”
—David Wondrich, author of Imbibe! and Punch

“Tiki is simultaneously whimsical and sincere, simple and shockingly complex, which means understanding it can be challenging. This indispensable book explains it all—and is the definitive volume on one of the cocktail world’s most fascinating and complex genres. But in the end, tiki’s essence is based on captivating stories and exotic drinks, and Martin Cate’s Smuggler’s Cove is a tour de force in both.”
—Jordan Mackay, wine and spirits writer, and coauthor of Secrets of the Sommeliers
 
“Martin Cate understands tiki like few others do. He not only knows how to ask the right questions; in this book, he also answers many questions that I didn’t know I had. The old guard of Donn, Vic, and Steve can rest easy now that they have this champion of their tradition bringing tiki into the new millennium.”
—Sven Kirsten, author of The Book of Tiki, Tiki Modern, and Tiki Pop
 
“Here at last are the secrets behind one of the world’s best bars. The Cates have written an engaging, knowing, and personal book that is sure to please tiki lovers, cocktail lovers, and especially tiki-cocktail lovers. Abandon angst, all ye who enter here: like Smuggler’s Cove itself, these pages take leisure time very seriously.”
—Jeff “Beachbum” Berry, author of Potions of the Caribbean
 
“Martin Cate is an authority on rum, and this book will take your level of understanding of this noble yet complex spirit to a new level. Martin offers his own illuminating rum classification system, and also tackles controversial topics head-on, such as sweetening and the use of nebulous age statements. An absolute must-have for rum enthusiasts.”
—Richard Seale, master distiller, Foursquare Rum Distillery, Barbados
 
“The twenty-first-century revival of tiki cocktails was spearheaded by a handful of passionate tiki-geeks, Martin Cate among them. With Smuggler’s Cove, Martin and Rebecca teach you everything you need to know to become a tiki-geek in your own right—and to see the world with their Polynesian passion.”
–Gaz Regan, author of The Joy of Mixology and The Negron

“Tiki culture is enmeshed with rum, and the authors offer a master class on it, covering its history and many varieties, as well as digressions on coring pineapples for cocktails and where to score cocktail umbrellas. It’s a terrifically fun and informative read, and the definitive resource on the topic.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review 

“The book walks readers through the history of tiki, as well as 100 recipes for cocktails. Not sure where to start with rum? There''s a beginners'' guide. There are also party tips, garnishing guides, and much more. In other words, all you need are some paper umbrellas and your summer is made.”
Epicurious 

“Happily, the modern tiki era now has its own Magna Carta …. It’s a lavishly illustrated, seriously researched, 350-page tome with more than 100 recipes, along with a well-written history and sketches of some of the lesser known tiki lights . . .”
– The Daily Beast

"Martin and Rebecca Cate have managed to create an irresistible shrine to the magic of Polynesian pop culture. Beautifully designed and dripping in kitsch by way of photos by Dylan + Jeni, this is set to be the cocktail book of the summer."
– Punch 

"Your new tiki bible."
– Eater 

"With more than 100 recipes, both classic and modern (including homemade grenadine and coconut cream, of course), Smuggler''s Cove is for anyone who appreciates the beauty of tropical drinks and wants to dig in deeper. A primer on essential tiki techniques as well as a thorough, authoritative guide to rum take you further than the typical booze book."
Saveur

"Martin Cate is a scholar of tiki, and this long-anticipated cookbook is a respectful (and even academic) glimpse into that culture. . . .  Smuggler’s Cove isn''t just a book of recipes—it''s a guide on how to transplant a beloved bar into your home."
– Epicurious 

"A lively exploration of our country''s drinking history (and the current tiki scene), it''s essential reading for rum lovers, offering the best categorization of the headspinning-ly diverse spirit that I''ve encountered."
– Serious Eats


"It''s a must-have for any Mai Tai lover, Trader Vic''s devotee or Hawaiian traveler . . .  The book works equally well as a cocktail how-to, a rum guide, tiki party inspiration or must-do itinerary."
– San Jose Mercury News

About the Author

MARTIN CATE is a rum and exotic cocktail expert and the owner of Smuggler’s Cove in San Francisco. Smuggler’s Cove opened in 2009 and has been named one of the World’s 50 Best Bars ( Drinks International, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015), 50 Best Bars on Earth ( The Sunday Times, London), Top Ten Food and Beverage Concepts of the Last 25 Years ( Cheers Magazine), 13 Most Influential Bars of the 21st Century (Liquor.com), and America’s Best Bars ( Playboy, 2012 and Esquire, 2013). Smuggler''s Cove was also awarded Best American Cocktail Bar at the 2016 Tales of the Cocktail Spirited Awards. A member of the United States Bartenders Guild (USBG), Martin conducts educational seminars and adjudicates rum and cocktail competitions across the United States, Europe, and the Caribbean. In 2015, along with partners Alex Smith and John Park, Martin opened Whitechapel in San Francisco to bring the same passion for history and craft to the world of gin. He is also the co-owner of Hale Pele in Portland and a partner in Lost Lake in Chicago and False Idol in San Diego.


In 1999, REBECCA CATE inadvertently fueled Martin’s madness by famously uttering words (which she thought were a joke) about making a spare bedroom a home tiki bar. Since then, however, she too has been swept up in the tiki fantasia, first as an enthusiast, then helping Martin open and run Smuggler’s Cove, while juggling a full-time career as a research psychologist “on the side.” Rebecca earned her PhD in personality and social psychology from The University of California at Berkeley in 2006, and has spent over a decade leading large-scale studies of behavioral health interventions as well as topics related to retirement and longevity. The opportunity to coauthor this book has allowed what had been just a weekend and vacation escape to turn into a full-time journey.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Part One: An Invitation to Escape
The Birth of Tiki 23
The Golden Era 47
The Tiki Revival 71

Part Two: Smuggler’s Cove: The Modern Tiki Bar
Creating the Space 101
Curating the Experience 123

Part Three: The Spirit of Rum
Rum Through the Ages 149
Understanding Rum 183

Part Four: Exotic Cocktails: Mystique and Technique
The Theater of the Exotic Cocktail 215
Eight Essential Exotic Elixirs 255

Part Five: Creating Paradise
The Tiki Look and Feel 281
The Tiki Party 295

Epilogue
The Heritage of Tiki 315
House-Made Ingredients 324
Resources 335
Bibliography and Additional Reading 340
A Few of My Favorite Tiki Spots 342


The Tiki
The word tiki originated in New Zealand and the Marquesas Islands, where it can refer to a carving of a first man, a god, or a symbol of procreation depending on which culture it originated from. But eventually, mainland Americans appropriated the word to describe any Polynesian carving with a largely human form, exaggerated features, and a menacing visage. What’s more, mainlanders started carving the tikis themselves, occasionally with an eye to their South Pacific origins, but more often with a “whimsical and naïve attitude toward another people’s extinct religion,” as historian Sven Kirsten puts it. These artists were inspired to add their own flair and style to the carvings. Thus was born a new kind of tiki whose provenance lay in many lands and imaginations, and would later become a tenet of Polynesian Pop.


Halekulani Cocktail

Open the door to paradise with this 1930s treat from the famous House Without a Key on Waikiki Beach.

ORIGIN
House Without a Key lounge,
Halekulani Hotel, Waikiki Beach, circa 1930s

SOURCE Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari ,
adapted by Smuggler’s Cove

GLASSWARE Chilled coupe

1⁄2 ounce fresh lemon juice

1⁄2 ounce fresh orange juice
1⁄2 ounce pineapple juice
1⁄4 ounce SC Demerara Syrup 
1⁄2 teaspoon SC Grenadine 
11⁄2 ounces bourbon
1 dash Angostura bitters

GARNISH
Edible orchid 

Combine all the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with cracked or cubed ice. Shake and double-strain into a chilled coupe and garnish with an edible orchid on the edge of the glass.

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Customer reviews

4.9 out of 54.9 out of 5
2,443 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

PhysProf
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
routinely disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2019
UPDATE: Having owned this book for more than a year now, and having invested loads of money in good rums and many mixers testing recipes, I have to say this book is a let down. I get the distinct impression that every recipe has been tweaked to be... See more
UPDATE:
Having owned this book for more than a year now, and having invested loads of money in good rums and many mixers testing recipes, I have to say this book is a let down.

I get the distinct impression that every recipe has been tweaked to be not-quite-right. Everything comes out just a little bit imbalanced and has to be diagnosed and fixed. That seems consistent with other evidence the author wanted to produce a book but not reveal his best recipes. In fact, in the non-recipe for the Rum Barrel, he says as much in text.

After a while I started checking the recipes against well respected websites and they seem to confirm that those in the book are not quite what they should be.

Original review:
This book is more a story about Tiki and less a recipe book. It''s laid out in a way that makes it hard to find cocktail recipes. There is no tabular index of cocktails laid out by style or ingredient, etc. Many of the recipes are either basic or call for particular syrups or additives. There''s a listing of rums, but no descriptions, ratings, or tasting notes. Some tables would go a long way to making this book more useful.
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sdduuuude
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A masterpiece. Start saving up to go shopping for some amazing and expensive ingredients.
Reviewed in the United States on January 10, 2017
So, I''ve always been a fan of the "zombie" drink, but it is pretty hard to find a good one. There is so much rum in it that if you get the ingredients or ratios wrong, it turns into an unpleasant shot of rum and bad flavors. So, I rarely order them. Last... See more
So, I''ve always been a fan of the "zombie" drink, but it is pretty hard to find a good one. There is so much rum in it that if you get the ingredients or ratios wrong, it turns into an unpleasant shot of rum and bad flavors. So, I rarely order them.

Last October, I tried to make one, thinking a "zombie" would be a perfect drink for a Halloween party, and thinking it would be nice to learn how to make one so I didn''t have to rely on the lame ones I have received in the past. A couple of attempts using internet recipes turned out very badly. Sigh.

Just wait - I''m getting to the book ...

In November, we got an invitation to a tiki bar in San Diego called "False Idol" and I decided to ordered their zombie. The angels sang. The pearly gates opened and I walked into heaven. Awesome.

So, in December, I was travelling in San Francisco and went to the Tonga Room there. It was very disappointing. Drinks were quite poor, which was a big surprise for such a long-established icon. As I was reading Yelp reviews on the Tonga Room, I saw mention of a place called Smuggles Cove in San Francisco that had won awards, voted best bar in America, one of the best in the world, yada, yada, yada. And I was kicking myself for going to the Tonga Room instead of Smugglers Cove. Apparently the owner, Martin Cate, really knows his cocktails, and - ta-da - is a partner in the False Idol in San Diego and the guy behind the drinks there !

In January, I stumbled upon his book on Amazon - some web search or Amazon search brought it up, I''m sure. I don''t remember. I saw the title, noted the author, saw that it had recipes in it and ordered it. I was a little concerned that it would be lots of stories and not much recpies, but it turns out it is alot of stories and also alot of recipes.

I am very surprised that a bar owner in a business where drink recpies have been traditionally kept secret is willing to spill the beans like this. He has presented so many secrets, along with the stories and history behind the secrets and also given credit to alot of the people responsible for digging up the secrets. It''s mighty big of him, I think, and consider this a big "thank you" for writing this book.

Some good things about the book:
- Martin has developed a list of rum categories based on production method to assist in the selection of rums for the recipes. Most of the recipes in the book don''t call for a particular brand and style of rum, but call for a certain category of rum, which could be one of many brands and styles. It is really smart and really helps the budget, too, because you don''t have to buy the $80 bottle if you don''t want to.
- Really a lot of recipes in here. I saw one Amazon reivew saying there weren''t many recipes. That is just wrong. The recipes are scattered throughout the book and relate to the text in each chapter, but there are more than anyone could want.
- Also, reading between the lines, you can figure out how to take any of these cocktails and change the ingredients to make your own recipes, so the number of recipes is unlimited if you are willing to experiment.
- Martin lists a whole bunch of syrups and concoctions that are used in the recipes. This is very helpful,and again - very generous of him to show us these secrets from his bars. Real grenadine syrup, demerera sugar syrup, cinnamon syrup, passion fruit syrup, etc.
- I am surprised by a couple things. First - that the drinks are not necessarily super sweet and fruity. Second, there are an extraordinary number of interesting ingredients that I never knew existed or how they were used. These ingredients are herbal, spicey or savory and keep the drinks from getting too that sweet.
- Great details on ice choice and mixing techniques.
- I''m not that much into tiki decor so alot of that design stuff was not interesting to me, but I also feel the book would be incomplete without it.

Things I would add or change / the downside:
- I would like to see some descriptions of the non-rum ingredients on the recipe pages. As I was looking through the recipes, many listed ingredients that I didn''t know what the heck they were. Maybe they were in the text, but I didn''t want to hunt through and find it. It would be nice if some explanation were given for those, or maybe put a little reference section in the back and add a page number to the recipe so you can read up on it, like "Benedictine (see page 444)".
- Some of the syrups were a little sweet, making it difficult to adjust the recipe without changing the sweetness. For example, I made a drink with the cinnamon syrup and wanted more cinnamon flavor. So, I added some cinnamon syrup, but it was too sweet. The syrups make perfect sense in a bar where you want the bartenders to make the same thing every time, and save some work. But if you want to tinker, it may be better to just add the ingredients separately.
- This is an expensive hobby. Martin has done a good job making sure we don''t waste our money by putting expensive ingredients into bad cocktails, but it aint cheap.

I have made about 6 of the recipes so far. Enjoying them all, especially the zombie and the Planters Punch !
I hope to meet Martin some day. He''s done a great job with his bar in San Diego and the book. Thanks a bunch !
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Alex
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great intermediate guide for Tiki drinks
Reviewed in the United States on January 20, 2020
I got this as a gift for my partner, who''s really into mixology. We''ve purchased a few cocktail recipe books, and drink bibles over the years, and thought it was time to take that next leap, and ride that tiki wave. We''ve been using it for a months straight, making new... See more
I got this as a gift for my partner, who''s really into mixology. We''ve purchased a few cocktail recipe books, and drink bibles over the years, and thought it was time to take that next leap, and ride that tiki wave. We''ve been using it for a months straight, making new drinks almost every single night. It''s been a lot of fun, and was well worth it for anyone wanting to get more familiar with tiki culture.

The book doesn''t just have drink recipes, it''s full of terminology, and background information relating to culture, and origins of the drinks. I would recommend giving it a good read when you get the chance, but don''t be afraid to flip to the back pages, pick out a drink based on ingredients you have, and give it a go.

Now that all the good parts of the review are on the table, I''d like to get into a bit more information I would have liked to know before I bought the book, that in no way would have stopped me from enjoying every minute of the adventure. First off, I wouldn''t call it a beginners guide, at least not for someone who''s never gotten into drink making before. We''ve been studying food chemistry, and making drinks for years, and this book threw us for a loop more than once. It''s not too difficult once you master a drink or two, but if you''re not confident in your skill, or if you''re not the type to get back up and try again if it doesn''t turn out, you may want to wait a bit on this one.

Secondly, I highly recommend skimming pages 345-352 once you''ve purchased the book. There you can navigate the content a lot better, and it will help you choose drinks more easily based on common ingredients. I''d recommend picking five drinks you''d like to try, check all their recipes, and compile a list of ingredients you may need to make them. One of the most important things to know about this book, is that it can be resource intensive, and some of the recipes call for produce, and drink mixing items that might be difficult to find in more rural areas. That being said, after you''ve compiled a list of ingredients, go through and try your hand at some drinks. Pick one you really like and try to master the technique behind it. Once you do that, the rest is history.

Finally, some ingredients I personally needed before using this book were as follows: Aged rum, Black rum, (Really all of the rum.... Like. All of it.), Vodka, Gin, Orgeat (DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP Orgeat is necessary for more tha HALF the drinks in this book. It''s really easy to make, there''s a recipe in the book.) Citrus, so so much citrus, Oranges, Limes, Lemons, Grapefruit, and Sooooooo much pineapple juice.

Hopefully this review helped someone out there! We really enjoy this book, and hope that it will help bring some flavor into other peoples drink routines as well!
19 people found this helpful
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Jean Grey
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A lovely tome IF you''re a cocktail snob
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2021
The book is lovely to look at and the information presented about tiki as a subculture is fabulous, BUT it''s not a great book for cocktail recipes. Rums, for example, are listed by type but without the use of the common nomenclature that makes it easy to shop for. Be... See more
The book is lovely to look at and the information presented about tiki as a subculture is fabulous, BUT it''s not a great book for cocktail recipes. Rums, for example, are listed by type but without the use of the common nomenclature that makes it easy to shop for. Be prepared to spend a lot of time googling examples of things like "pot still lightly aged" and "blended lightly aged" as opposed to the more common terms like light, dark, gold, or spiced. I find this diminishes the real-world usability and makes the recipes more useful if you''re the type of person who would describe yourself as a cocktail snob. When specific brands are listed (roughly a hundred and ninety pages after the terms are provided - seriously, who edited this thing?) it''s exclusively higher end, costlier brands. To me, the lack of accessibility is the opposite of the tiki spirit. It''s a shame, because the cultural info is terrific.
6 people found this helpful
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Mad Hatter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The best book for tiki cocktails
Reviewed in the United States on June 9, 2016
Smuggler''s Cove is the book to have for tiki cocktails. I''ve made three of the drinks so far and they have all been winners. One of the best things about the book is the author lists 7 types of rum and the recipes specify a type instead of a specific bottle which means... See more
Smuggler''s Cove is the book to have for tiki cocktails. I''ve made three of the drinks so far and they have all been winners. One of the best things about the book is the author lists 7 types of rum and the recipes specify a type instead of a specific bottle which means the your home bar only needs 7 bottles of rum. Many cocktail books call for specific bottles which gets both expensive and unwieldy after awhile. The recipes aren''t overly complicated which I appreciate as well. I have books from other famous bars and for some books, making one drink is a huge project. I look forward to working my way through more recipes.

The text of book is fantastic as well. It gives a great account of the origins of tiki culture in the USA and how Smuggler''s Cove came to be.
23 people found this helpful
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Lori Grace
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The only tiki cocktail book you''ll ever need
Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2016
This is a beautiful book. I only got it today and just started reading it so this is a preliminary review but this is one of the best-looking, best-reading cocktail books I''ve picked up in a very long time. With photos and art on nearly every page, Martin Cate''s writing is... See more
This is a beautiful book. I only got it today and just started reading it so this is a preliminary review but this is one of the best-looking, best-reading cocktail books I''ve picked up in a very long time. With photos and art on nearly every page, Martin Cate''s writing is clear and entertaining. There are more than a hundred recipes throughout the chapters, along with well-written information about the history of the tiki culture; everything about rum and how it''s made; making the drinks (extensive info here); setting up your own home bar and throwing a tiki party.This book is not only a delight to read but it would be an appropriate gift for the cocktail-lover in your life.
18 people found this helpful
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Robbo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Encylopedic history of tiki cocktails - great read!
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2020
Having grown up with Trader Vic''s locations, and after living for a number of years in Hawaii (hello, La Mariana!), I am fascinated with tiki bars and cocktails. When I moved to San Francisco in 2019, I was thrilled to learn that Martin Cate''s Smuggler''s Cove was... See more
Having grown up with Trader Vic''s locations, and after living for a number of years in Hawaii (hello, La Mariana!), I am fascinated with tiki bars and cocktails.

When I moved to San Francisco in 2019, I was thrilled to learn that Martin Cate''s Smuggler''s Cove was only 2 block away from my home. Unfortunately, every time I have visited the bar, seating has been limited and cramped - but the cocktails were always superb.

Martin and Rebecca''s book has become one of my primary bar references - I can now enjoy their superb tiki cocktails in the comfort of my home. I have also relished his meticulous, encyclopedic research into the history of tiki drinks.

In the not too distant future, I hope to move back to the Hawaiian Islands and set up/manage a tiki-focused establishment. This book will have been one of my inspirations.
2 people found this helpful
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JenTiki
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is the book you''ve been waiting for!
Reviewed in the United States on June 21, 2016
Everything you''ve ever wanted to know about tiki, tiki cocktails, and tiki bars, and more! Since leaving the SF Bay Area almost two years ago, I''ve missed the Smuggler''s Cove drinks more than almost anything. Now I can make (most) of my favorites at home!! There are even... See more
Everything you''ve ever wanted to know about tiki, tiki cocktails, and tiki bars, and more! Since leaving the SF Bay Area almost two years ago, I''ve missed the Smuggler''s Cove drinks more than almost anything. Now I can make (most) of my favorites at home!! There are even recipes for all the house-made syrups they use. The surprise ingredient in the Mai Tai Simple Syrup is a revelation! This book should be required reading for anyone who considers themselves tiki enthusiasts or craft bartenders. As a rum enthusiast, I am especially appreciative of the rum categorization system Martin has devised. It makes finding the right rum for a cocktail so much easier and clears up a lot of the confusion created by the existing "light rum, gold rum, dark rum" categories that make no sense at all!

Even if you never make a single drink from this book, the writing style and the stories are entertaining and informative enough to have at least one copy on your shelf (I have one at home and one at the office).
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Top reviews from other countries

PrettyGreenParrot
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant and practical exploration of Tiki
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 6, 2020
Wonderful book. Lots of history, information, and some great recipes. Almost palpable enthusiasm from the authors really inspires you to try the recipes and make some of the bar ingredients like Demerara syrup (simple syrup but with Demerara), cinnamon syrup, etc. The rum...See more
Wonderful book. Lots of history, information, and some great recipes. Almost palpable enthusiasm from the authors really inspires you to try the recipes and make some of the bar ingredients like Demerara syrup (simple syrup but with Demerara), cinnamon syrup, etc. The rum chapter would make a nice small book on its own and provided a great exposition on the diversity of rum. It also neatly breaks the rums down into the ones you ‘need’ for Tiki cocktails: 8 essential rum types. Thankfully all types, though not all brands, are available in the U.K.
One person found this helpful
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POC
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The definitive Tiki cocktail book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 16, 2018
This book will give you both a history and an understanding of how Tiki cocktails came to be along with tried and tested recipes and a taxonomy of rum to help you get to grips with this diverse spirit - though on this note the recommendation is a minimum of 8 types of rum...See more
This book will give you both a history and an understanding of how Tiki cocktails came to be along with tried and tested recipes and a taxonomy of rum to help you get to grips with this diverse spirit - though on this note the recommendation is a minimum of 8 types of rum you can make most of their cocktails with, but you can make most with 2 to 4. Also note they never list Havana Club rums as options because they''re not available in the U.S but thankfully in the U.K they are, and they''re somewhat cheaper than their U.S available equivalents.
2 people found this helpful
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J Kenny
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great read written with passion and insight
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 7, 2020
Quickly discovered after journeying down a Tiki rabbit hole that what Martin Cate doesn''t know about Tiki cocktails, rum and culture simply isn''t worth knowing. A fantastic resource for cocktail methods, recipes, materials and paraphernalia as much as it is a really...See more
Quickly discovered after journeying down a Tiki rabbit hole that what Martin Cate doesn''t know about Tiki cocktails, rum and culture simply isn''t worth knowing. A fantastic resource for cocktail methods, recipes, materials and paraphernalia as much as it is a really engaging read on Tiki history. A must have for anyone who has ever had a Mai Tai that contains grenadine and wondered, as I did, why the hell is this horrid drink so famous? The real Mai Tai recipe you will find in here will knock your socks off.
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Dreampast
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Essential for All serious Cocktail Enthusiasts everywhere
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 26, 2020
Excellent book with historic revelation as to how cocktails became known by their names Book has different recipes from around the world -excellent Must have book for Serious Cocktail enthusiasts
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11brooksd
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A wonderful romp through a fascinating world
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 23, 2018
This book is quite simply joyous. The passion evident in Cate''s writing shines through in every chapter, whether he is decrypting Trader Vic''s Mai Tai recipe or addressing more practical matters such as how to best prepare punch for your own Tiki party. Even as a newcomer...See more
This book is quite simply joyous. The passion evident in Cate''s writing shines through in every chapter, whether he is decrypting Trader Vic''s Mai Tai recipe or addressing more practical matters such as how to best prepare punch for your own Tiki party. Even as a newcomer to Tiki culture and exotic cocktails I read the whole thing cover to cover as if it were a novel, pausing only to look up the websites and forums he mentions or to pop down to my local liquor store to stock up on rums for all the recipes I plan to try! Whether you are drawn in by the rum-expertise, the advice for setting up a home bar or simply the excellently told narrative of the history of Polynesian Pop, this book certainly will not disappoint.
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Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online

Smuggler's 2021 sale Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki online